Engaging Tech Activities

    Engaging activities you will use to change your instructional routine.

    Edpuzzle

    https://edpuzzle.com/home

    Ever watch a video on math instruction and which you could just use the middle? Or like the problem but want to explain it yourself?  Edpuzzle allows you to do just that. You can record over the explanation, trim the video, insert questions in the video to make sure students are paying attention. I have done some of these using a funny voice to demonstrate slope and the kids always remembered.

    Here are some examples:

    Solving equations using multiple-choice questions

    Geometry two different versions. In the first, it is a basic introductory to terms with open-ended questions. The teacher has cropped the 34-minute video down to 2 minutes.

    This started with the same 34-minute video and this video is now 11 minutes.

    You can make your own videos and design the questions yourself or look through videos that have already been prepared with the questions and use as they are. If you have a flipped classroom, these are ideal for students to use as instructional notes before class or use with a substitute and add more questions.  Great for students who have been absent as well. Post them in google classroom so students can review before a test.

    Symbaloo

    https://www.symbaloo.com/

    Keeping track of internet resources can be difficult, but this tool from Google makes everything simple.  I keep a board for Algebra, one for Geometry, and use it personally as well. I mentor new teachers and have a board just for new teacher tools and mentoring strategies.

    Just create a tile, add the link and it will be there forever.

    Math Pickle

    http://www.mathpickle.com

    Has some interesting puzzles and games for students covering a variety of topics. I like the pasta packing activity to introduce volume to students.  That activity has a video and for those students who need a challenge, some additional activities.  One of the offerings is a video introducing parallel lines and slope.

    Edulastic

    edulastic.com

    This works great for review and practice tests as a formative assessment for me so I know what concepts to cover before the big test day.  I actually hate tests. It is boring while students are quietly working away and all that silence is unnerving.  However, I realize we live in the age of testing everything and despite my boredom and dislike for tests, they are a necessary evil.

    The site is free, has hundreds of problems. Try using the problems as part of a warm-up or whole-class review. You could even use the problems and have the students use whiteboards to answer. You can even upload your own created test to the system.

    Math Forum/ NCTM

    http://www.mathforum.org

    Math Forum is now a part of nctm.org and you will need to be a member to access.  However, there are so many resources here that the membership is worthwhile just for the problems of the week alone since there are over 200 of these problems in just in Geometry and nearly 2000 in total. I used these as a new teacher to expand student thinking.  In this problem <1 = 2x = 10 , < 2 = 5x-40 and < 4 = 60 degrees. Find the measures of < 1, < 2, <3.

    Try this for a warm-up in class.  This always gets students talking.  How many squares are in the diagram below:

    Which One Doesn’t Belong

    http://wodb.ca/shapes.html

    This is a great site for visual relationships and students have to decide which one does not belong with the others. What is interesting is the thinking that visual puzzles will produce in students. They may see a relationship different from what is expected. Which one doesn’t belong in the picture below? And make sure you ask why.

    As well as number puzzles the site has graphs as well.

    Set Game

    https://www.setgame.com/set/puzzle

    Game changes every day and the previous days’ solution is posted.   You are making sets based on shape, color, number, and shading. Instructions are available to download. I confess I did not find all the sets this puzzle, but practice will help.

    There are 5 sets of 3.

    Visual Patterns

    http://www.visualpatterns.org/

    At this site, there are some more visual patterns.  For each of these students will find the number in step 43 by writing an equation. Great practice and enough patterns to keep the kids busy all year.

    Solve Me

    http://solveme.edc.org/

    This site has several types of puzzles and patterns you can use. This is one of the simpler ones as well as one of the balance problems that could introduce equations.

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